Muslim theology of religions

Call for paper: MIDEO 33 (2018)

Islam and religions. The topic is not new. At the time of early Islam, it referred to the relations and interactions between Muslims and non-Muslims. In the first centuries of Islam, it was discussed in the context of treaties on dogmas and practices of different “sects” and religions. It classifies the numerous Refutations (rudūd) towards Jews, Christians, Zoroastrians or heterodox Muslim factions and deals with the legal question (fiqh) of the rights and duties of the non-Muslims on the one hand and the Muslims’ on the other hand.1

Since the eighties, the question has been subject to a renewed interest, especially because of the influence of the Christian theology. The aim is to question the view of the Koran, the Sunna or some Muslim thinkers towards non-Muslims and their religions. In this perspective, some have tried to assess whether the paradigms of exclusivism, inclusivism and pluralism brought forward within a Christian theology of religions could be used to explain the Islam’s views about non-Muslim religions.2 Thus, thinkers or philosophers question the Koran and already highlight the existence of “pluralist” verses.3
A Muslim theology of non-Muslims and religions is emerging. Many questions, otherwise classical, are linked to this theology. What role does God give to or expect from non-Muslims? How does he judge the actions of a non-Muslim in order to serve him or to serve humanity4 and what value should be given to the non-Muslim religion in passing on spiritual virtues? What is the theological and legal status of the books other religions?5 Can salvation be considered for a non-Muslim?6

The MIDEO 33 (2018) dedicates a file to this topic and welcomes the publication of articles and various texts which can contribute to put into perspective a Muslim theology of religions.


Articles must be submitted to MIDEO’s direction in .doc and .PDF file before April, 1st 2017 to gro.o1477522665riac-1477522665oedi@1477522665oedim1477522665 following the style guide. After an “anonymous” reading by two rapporteurs, writers will be informed within three months whether their article is accepted or not. The texts will be corrected in the fall of 2017 and the publication is planned for the first quarter of 2018.

(1) Yohann Friedmann, Tolerance and Coercion in Islam Interfaith Relations in the Muslim Tradition, Cambridge University Press, 2006.
(2) Mahmoud Ayoub, ‘‘Islam and the Challenge of Religious Pluralism” in Global Dialogue 2, 1, Winter 2000, p. 53‒64.
(3) Adnane Mokrani, « Le pluralisme religieux dans le Coran », MIDEO 28, 2010, p. 279‒293.
(4) Mortaza Motahari, Divine Fair, Tehran, Sadra Publication, 2000.
(5) Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, Leiden, 1996 ; Éric Chaumont, « Nous et la loi des autres : La question du statut des lois antérieurement révélées (sharʿ man kāna qablanā) en théorie légale sunnite » dans Droits et culture, Mélanges en l’honneur du Doyen Yadh Ben Achour, Tunis, Centre de publication universitaire, 2008, p. 83-105.
(6) Emmanuel Pisani, « Hors de l’islam point de salut ? Eschatologie d’al-Ġazālī », MIDEO 30, 2014, p.139-184.

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